Your Bone Health and How to Maintain It As You Age

Your bones play a huge role in your ability to age on your terms. While it’s vital to build strong bones during childhood and adolescence, there are steps you can take in adulthood to protect your bone health for better aging.

Bone Health

Why Is It Important?

Your bones are constantly changing. New bones made and old broken down. Your body makes new bones quickly when you are young, making bones faster than they are broken down. This increases bone density and mass.

However, by age 30, most people reach their peak bone mass. After that, you lose slightly more bone mass than you gain. The development of osteoporosis, a condition that causes bones to become weak and brittle, depends on the bone mass you attain by the time you reach age 30 and how rapidly you lose it after that. The higher your peak bone mass, the less likely you are to develop osteoporosis. 

This is good for young people, but what can seniors do to ensure their bones stay healthy as they age?

What Affects Bone Health

There are many factors that influence bone health as you age. Some of them include:

  • Amount of calcium in the diet
  • Physical activity
  • Tobacco and Alcohol use
  • Gender
  • Weight
  • Age
  • Race and family history

What to Do to Keep Bones Healthy?

There are a few things you can do to ensure your bones remain healthy as you age:

  • Include lots of calcium in your diet.
  • Pay attention to vitamin D because it’s needed to absorb calcium.
  • Include lots of physical activity in your daily routine.
  • Avoid excessive drinking.
  • Quit smoking.

Talk to Your Doctor

If you are concerned about your bone health, consult your doctor. They might recommend a bone density test to determine your risk.

Looking for some other new secrets to living a healthy lifestyle? With this FREE A-Z guide on Living and Aging the Way You Want you can learn the ABCs of aging successfully. Download your PDF and start living the lifestyle you want.

Twin Towers is a continuing care retirement community in Cincinnati, Ohio, offering patio homes, apartments, rehab services and more. We’re focused on supporting the vibrant and active lifestyles of our residents so they can age well. For more information, contact Twin Towers online or at 513-853-2000.

Smart Retiree Savings Tips Makes You a Savvy Senior

When it comes to your finances, no one wants to be caught off guard. Yet many retirees need to consider more than just their finances. That’s why we made this retiree checklist, so if you’re already retired what should you be doing? Here are your retiree savings tips:

Retiree Savings Tips

Don’t Set It and Forget It

When selecting investment plans, it may be tempting to “set it and forget it.” However, you should always be proactive when it comes to your retirement savings and re-adjusting may be necessary at some point. There is a great debate within the world of professional investors whether a target-date fund, or set it and forget it fund, is really the best option. The industry changes frequently and you should always be assessing your risk. 

Delay Drawing Social Security

When to take Social Security is dependent on your circumstances. Should you choose, you can start taking your benefits as early as 62 or you can wait to reach the full retirement age of 70. While there is no right or wrong way to claim your benefits, delaying Social Security can really pay off.

Move Somewhere with Lower Cost of Living

Choosing where you want to live during your retirement is just as much of a financial decision as it is a lifestyle one. People may want to move to a place with a lower cost of living as a strategy for saving more money in retirement. For some, making this decision is an easy one, but for others, it is fraught with emotion. The home that works for you in early retirement, may not work for you later down the road.

One thing people often consider is moving to their favorite vacation spot, though this requires some consideration. Many vacation spots are seasonal and may not be much fun in the off-season or fit with the rest of your lifestyle.

Downsize

The big question on many retirees’ lips is; should I downsize my home? The answer depends on your circumstances. Some factors may include costs and potential health care issues. Appropriately weighing all the factors will help you decide.

  • Cost of Selling: Selling your home comes with some expenses. You may have to renovate or update your home to get the best price and don’t forget about the realtor’s commission. If you happen to make money in the sale, capital gains taxes could apply.
  • Cost of Moving: Don’t forget about the costs that come with moving, like closing costs, movers, and other unanticipated expenses.
  • Health Concerns: As you age, your health may become more of a concern. If you or your spouse have mobility issues, a two-story home may become too much of a burden or hindrance to mobility. If your home is one-story, are the doors and passageways wide enough to easily get through with walkers? 

For tips on how to downsize, check out this article

Move to a Continuing Care Retirement Community

Over the past few years, Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRC), otherwise known as Life Plan Communities, have become popular retirement options. A CCRC provides a continuum of care for its residents, which creates a sense of security and peace of mind. Offering an array of living options and supportive services, residents enjoy life on their own terms without the hassle of home maintenance or multiple monthly bills to manage,

Now that you read retiree savings tips, wondering what your future has to offer in your golden years? Learn about aging on your terms with your FREE Moving to a Senior Living Community: Make Decisions Your Way

Twin Towers is a continuing care retirement community in Cincinnati, Ohio, offering patio homes, apartments, rehab services and more. We’re focused on supporting the vibrant and active lifestyles of our residents so they can age well. For more information, contact Twin Towers online or at 513-853-2000.

Heart Health Myths Busted and How to Load a Better Plate

There are a lot of myths out there about your heart health and heart disease. We are here today to clear up some confusion. Not only is it essential to know the facts and the fiction of heart disease, but you also need to know what to put on your plate for cardiovascular wellness. Here, you will get the best of both worlds.

Heart Health Myths

If I Had High Blood Pressure or High Cholesterol, I’d know it.

No, unfortunately, you wouldn’t unless you received a blood pressure test. That’s the only sure way to determine hypertension (high blood pressure) or high cholesterol. The symptoms and risk factors are commonly silent. A person can be in shape and thin but still have high cholesterol and high blood pressure.

Heart Disease Looks the Same in Men and Women

Not true, we’re afraid. Heart disease affects the sexes very differently. According to one study published in Circulation, 43% of women felt no chest pain before a heart attack and were more likely to experience fatigue and sleep disturbances instead. Although men tend to have more “classic” symptoms, they are less prevalent in women. 

Young Women Aren’t at Risk for Heart Disease

Our research determined that this too is a myth. Heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women. It’s not just a concern for women in their 60’s and 70’s but a problem for the young as well. As the risk factors that contribute to heart disease increase at younger ages, so too does the risk of heart disease. The factors include:

  • Type Two Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Hypertension

Exercise and Activity is Bad For You If You Have a Heart Condition

As you may have guessed, this is not only a myth but a particularly detrimental one. After a heart attack, most people are encouraged to get right into rehabilitation and an exercise routine, usually with a coach. There are very few people who would be restricted significantly from exercise.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Aspirin are Good For Heart Health

For the most part, this one is true. However, there are some caveats to their benefits. Common aspirin recommendations for heart attack prevention occur at age 50 for men and 65 for women, if there are no other complications. That being said, aspirin can exacerbate stomach issues and some allergies.

Omega 3 fatty acids are especially beneficial to people who already suffer from cardiovascular issues and are trying to prevent another from occurring. However, taking a higher than the recommended daily dosage can lead to excessive bleeding.

How to Load Your Plate for Heart Health

The obvious answer is “with heart-healthy foods.” Here is a list of foods to add to your daily diet to promote heart health:

  • Leafy green vegetables
  • Whole grains
  • Berries
  • Avocados
  • Fatty fish
  • Walnuts
  • Beans
  • Dark chocolate
  • Tomatoes
  • Almonds
  • Seeds
  • Garlic
  • Olive oil
  • Edamame
  • Green tea

Looking for some other new secrets to living a healthy lifestyle? With this FREE A-Z guide on Living and Aging the Way You Want you can learn the ABCs of aging successfully. Download your PDF and start living the lifestyle you want.

Twin Towers is a continuing care retirement community in Cincinnati, Ohio, offering patio homes, apartments, rehab services and more. We’re focused on supporting the vibrant and active lifestyles of our residents so they can age well. For more information, contact Twin Towers online or at 513-853-2000.

The Mental Benefits of Stretching and How to Harness Stress Management

Have you ever experienced achy joints or back pain? Sure you have. Pain can interfere with our ability to focus and makes us more reactive in social and professional situations. One way to battle negativity caused by pain is to harness the mental benefits of stretching. 

Mental Benefits of Stretching

While most people know that exercise is essential for your overall health, not nearly as many people are aware of the power of stretching for mental health. Some think of stretching and exercise only in the context of yoga, however, stretching is a vital part of any exercise routine. Additionally, stretching can be done on its own without any additional activity to improve your health, mood, and mental well-being. You can expect to experience these benefits with regular stretching:

  • Help managing stress
  • Help with pain management
  • Boost energy levels
  • Enhance inner peace and positivity

Why Should You Stretch?

As we mentioned, it’s not just about physical fitness. Did you know that stretching can improve your mental outlook? Any type of stretching, yoga or otherwise, can reduce stress. This is because stretching increases circulation, promotes deep breathing, and reduces pain caused by inflammation. And the best part is that you don’t need to spend any money on equipment or gym memberships to start stretching daily.

When you stretch, your body releases some of your favorite feel-good chemicals – endorphins. Endorphins are hormones that engage the brain’s pain receptors and reduce your perceived pain levels. Additionally, when this occurs you also feel more positive and capable. When this reaction occurs, it can be compared to the way you feel while enjoying an entertaining TV program or spend time with a friend.

Tips for Proper Stretching

  • Warm-up before you stretch
  • Focus on tight and sore muscles
  • Don’t bounce when you stretch
  • Stretch for at least 10 minutes

Make Sure You’re Stretching Properly

You can actually do more harm than good by improper stretching. Especially if you’ve injured the area previously and attempt to stretch it poorly. If you feel any pain when you stretch, ease up and ask a professional how to stretch that muscle. You should focus on the major muscle groups like:

  • Upper back
  • Lower back
  • Pelvis
  • Legs
  • Hips
  • Neck
  • Shoulders

When it comes to stretches for mental health, routine is everything. Just put it on your calendar and remember it only takes a few minutes a day!

If you want other helpful tips to keep you energized as you age, check out our FREE e-book Living and Aging the Way You Want. Inside you will find helpful bits of advice on living your best life. Download your PDF by clicking the icon below.

Do You Smell That? Phantom Smells and Why We Have Them

We all know to worry about the smell of burnt orange, but what about orange juice? Phantom smells come in many forms and not all of them are causes for concern. However, it’s essential to know the difference between harmless hallucinations and when to sniff out danger.

What are Phantom Smells

Phantosmia, the fancy word for phantom smells, is a sense of smell disorder. It occurs when a person smells something that isn’t there. The odor may only affect one side of the nose or both nostrils. This is a relatively uncommon condition and makes up to 20% of smell-related disorders. Most cases lack a need for concern and will dissipate on their own. However, a rare number of cases indicate a health problem and should always be discussed with your doctor. Phantom smells can range over a variety of odors from pleasant to unpleasant with the most common being:

  • Burnt toast
  • Burning rubber
  • Cigarette smoke
  • Chemical or metallic smell
  • Spoiled or rotting smell
  • Stale or moldy smell

Oftentimes, sufferers are unable to identify the smell.

What Causes Phantosmia?

There are many reasons people experience phantom smells. Whether related to the nose or cognitive function, called central phantosmia, phantom smells can be distressing. Phantom smell problems with your nasal cavity may include:

  • Nasal polyps
  • Chronic sinus infections
  • Allergies
  • Tumors

Phantom smells associated with central phantosmia may include:

  • Epilepsy or seizures
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Head trauma
  • Migraines
  • Stroke
  • Depression
  • Medications

Phantosmia vs. Parosmia

Sometimes, phantosmia is confused with parosmia. Parosmia is a distorted sense of smell, when you are smelling real things but not accurately. For example, smelling oranges might smell like chemical cleaner instead. People with parosmia often describe the smells as unpleasant.

To make things even more confusing, phantosmia and parosmia often occur congruently, though parosmia is more common. Symptoms of parosmia range from mild to severe with the most severe forms causing debilitation as sufferers struggle to manage their symptoms.

Diagnosis

A diagnosis of phantosmia is performed by a doctor after a physical exam of the patient’s head and neck. They may inquire about other symptoms and perform further tests based on your answers to narrow down possibilities.

Further tests may include endoscopy or rhinoscopy to get a better look at the nasal cavity and rule out polyps or tumors.

When to Worry

Phantosmia is not often cause for concern, but if you are experiencing phantom smells you should always talk to your doctor.

Strange smells stressing you out? Learn how to manage your stress here!

Want to learn more scientific tips and tricks about aging well? Here is your FREE A-Z guide on Living and Aging the Way You Want. Click the icon and get your copy today!

Twin Towers is a continuing care retirement community in Cincinnati, Ohio, offering patio homes, apartments, rehab services and more. For more information, contact Twin Towers online or at 513-853-2000.

When is the Best Time to Move to a Senior Living Community Near You?

The simple answer is whenever you are ready. A great place to start is asking yourself if you are ready to give up the burden of home maintenance and simplify your life. However, there are certain times when moving to a new community is better than another. From the time of year to move-in deals, learn what you need to know about choosing the best time to move to a senior living community near you!

When is the Best Time to Move to a Senior Living Community?

Look For Senior Community Move-in Specials

First, let’s review what type of move-in specials and discounts are usually offered. As a savvy senior, you understand that comparing prices is easy. However, the best long-term plan goes just a little further than that, and winning the best deal means knowing what to look for. Many retirement communities feature move-in specials to ensure their maximum occupancy. Here are the most common senior community discounts:

  • Reduced monthly fees (or rent)
  • Community fees may be waived (also referred to as an entrance fee)
  • Extended rate lock (locked into a certain price for an extended period of time)
  • Free upgrades
  • Vouchers for extra services like dining, housekeeping, or other amenities

Best Time of Year to Move to a Senior Living Community

There is a distinct moving season for a reason. Some times of the year are significantly better to move than others and it is during these times that you will find many vacancies. Peak buying and selling for homes occurs from May through to August. The downside, however, is that you will pay premium prices if you move during these times. This goes for the community you move to as well as paying movers and storage. During this time of year, moving costs can rise by as much as 30%.

The holiday season also brings some interesting considerations when it comes to the best time to move. Even without the additional stress of moving, the holiday season presents its own specific moving challenges. Oftentimes, people rely on family and friends to help with a big move, so the holidays present a unique obstacle in getting everyone together. However, since there may be more family members home for the holidays — like college-age grandchildren — this can be an added benefit. 

Here are the best times to move:

  • Non-rainy parts of the year (usually after April)
  • Non-peak moving months (after August)
  • Before or after the holiday season
  • Most importantly, whenever you are ready

Ready to begin downsizing for your move? Here is the best FREE starter’s guide to beginning your next journey. Click the icon below to download your FREE copy to Real-Life Tips to Selling, Downsizing, & Moving.

6 Simple Steps for Senior Downsizing

Many seniors in America are looking to downsize, whether to make their lives easier or in preparation for a move. The thought of downsizing can be frustrating, but it doesn’t have to be that way. Here are some simple steps for senior downsizing to make your life a little simpler. 

Steps for Senior Downsizing

Start Early

It’s important to give yourself plenty of time for the downsizing process because, unfortunately, it will always take a little longer than you think. That being said, take your time and don’t try to rush through the process. Plan ahead so you will have enough time to take your time. About a month is a good starting time frame for downsizing your entire home. Go room by room with plenty of breaks.

Go through each item one by one to give each the attention it merits. Sometimes, it can help to say goodbye or to thank the item when deciding you no longer need it. This can help you in the decision-making process. To get in the right mindset for downsizing, read this article.

Start Small

You might already know there are things in the attic you want to get rid of but hesitate to dig into such a large space. No worries. Since you planned enough time, you don’t need to start with the biggest areas. Start in a place with few emotional items, like cabinets and closets.

For downsizing photo albums, check out our blog on converting your photos to digital.

Rule Out Rooms You Won’t Have Anymore

If you are downsizing to move into a smaller space, you won’t need all the stuff for the rooms you have now. Moving from a four-bedroom to a two-bedroom? Well, you won’t need all those extra sheets. You might not have an office, attic, or garage in your new space which means all the stuff that has accumulated in those spaces might have to go. These areas usually have great things to put in yard sales.

No Duplicates Needed

Like we mentioned earlier with cutting down on sheets, the same goes for duplicate items. This is extremely prevalent in areas like the kitchen and spare rooms. You might have a bunch of same-sized spatulas or even multiple blenders. Now is the time to reduce that clutter and cut down on your items.

No Maybe Piles

It’s tempting to put things to the side to decide on them later, but this is counterproductive to your goal. If you can’t make a decision about it now, why do you think you can later? Essentially, you’ll end up with a maybe pile that is bigger than your other piles. If that happens, then you haven’t really made any progress and will just have to go through those same items. Just make your decisions and move on.

Sell Your Stuff

With things like Craigslist and eBay, as well as many apps, yard sales are beginning to be a thing of the past. You likely won’t make a bunch of money, so don’t make how much time you invest in selling it a top priority. Posting things online is easy, fast and doesn’t take an entire day to make a few dollars.

However, the benefit of having a yard sale is you get the money right away. Whereas with online sales you might be waiting months to unload your stuff. Consignment is also an option but can take just as long if not longer than online sales.

Ready to begin downsizing for your move? Here is the best FREE starter’s guide to beginning your next journey. Click the icon below to download your FREE copy to Real-Life Tips to Selling, Downsizing, & Moving.

The Simple Truth About Foods and Macular Degeneration

We all know your diet can affect your weight and put you at risk for developing diabetes. But did you know that it can also have a major effect on your eye-sight and can prevent age-related macular degeneration? So, what is macular degeneration and how can it be avoided?

What is Macular Degeneration?

Macular degeneration occurs when the macula, a part of the eye, is damaged. The macula becomes damaged when deposits, known as drusen, begin to grow on the macula. The macula can also become damaged when new blood vessels begin to leak which in turn scars the macula. 

Diet and Eye Deterioration

These conditions can occur in a number of ways. Genetics and smoking have been long known factors, however, growing research indicates that it is heavily influenced by diet. In one study, 1,300 people participated and of those that had macular degeneration many had what is considered a “western” diet (containing high levels of red meats and fatty foods). The study found that some foods are linked to late-stage macular degeneration. Foods associated with degeneration include:

  • Red meat
  • Processed meats
  • Fried foods
  • High-fat dairy products
  • Fats in butter and margarine

Diet is one way to prevent risk factors of vision loss, especially if you are in the high-risk category due to a family history of the condition. Though it is important to point out that this study was observational and so inconclusive. This means there is no direct proof that a diet high in fats and processed food will cause macular degeneration, but simply that there was a correlation between the two. This led doctors to believe that if individuals were at high risk for the condition, they would likely want to reduce the problem foods in their diets since it indicates what doctors have suspected for years.

What You Can Do to Reduce Risk?

You can’t undo a lifetime of eating poorly. That is why it is important to adjust your diet now. If you have a diet high in processed foods and fatty items, it may be worth your consideration to change.

Try adding more fruits and vegetables to your diet as well as leaner proteins like fish. Understand that changing a life-long habit won’t happen overnight and may take as much as a decade to achieve. So, starting now and working toward a healthier future is important for the preservation of your overall health.

Additionally, at the risk of backlash, smoking has been observed as an additional connection and research indicated that your doctor will advise you to quit if you are in this high-risk category.

Want to learn more scientific tips and tricks about aging well? Here is your FREE A-Z guide on Living and Aging the Way You Want. Click the icon and get your copy today!

Twin Towers is a continuing care retirement community in Cincinnati, Ohio, offering patio homes, apartments, rehab services and more. For more information, contact Twin Towers online or at 513-853-2000.

Strong Connections Between Heart and Brain Health Made Simple

Losing brain function as you age is a common worry, and understandably so. However, one of the best ways to prevent cognitive degeneration is awareness. Memory loss and cognitive decline don’t have to be a part of your aging journey. Learn more about how your brain health is tied to the health of other important organs, particularly heart health. Your heart and brain health are closely tied and learning how they are connected will help you age better.

Hearth and Brain Health Connectivity

Vascular, or blood vessel, problems are numerous and vary by levels of severity. But when it comes to your brain, atherosclerosis is what you want to pay close attention to. This is a condition when fatty plaque builds up in the arteries. Another condition to keep track of is arteriosclerosis, the process of arteries stiffening as you age.

Both conditions are well-known contributors to cardiovascular disease, but these same issues can also damage your healthy brain function as you age. As the arteries stiffen and plaque builds up in the bloodstream, less oxygen is available in the bloodstream to fuel proper brain function. When your brain is deprived of appropriate levels of oxygen, cognitive function will decline and sufferers may experience symptoms from brain fog to brain damage. If left untreated, this can cause a condition known as vascular dementia.

Additionally, there is a connection between the buildup of plaque in the bloodstream and Alzheimer’s. As protein deposits, known as beta-amyloids, accumulate in the brain, the symptoms of Alzheimer’s will arise. This protein buildup is called hypoperfusion and means the brain isn’t getting sufficient blood flow over a long period of time. Due to this similarity, there is diagnostically no difference between Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia.

Awareness As Prevention

Much like your overall health, awareness is the key to preventing heart disease-related cognitive decline. This means that keeping your brain healthy starts with your heart. To keep your heart healthy you should regularly practice the following:

Make the Connection Between Brain and Heart Health

As we said, everything that is bad for your heart is also bad for your brain, so the more you take care of your cardiovascular health, the better you are taking care of your cognitive health.

Eat Better

If you are trying to preserve your cognitive function, eating well is a great place to start. A diet rich in lean proteins, fruits, and vegetables can work wonders for a healthy heart. These are foods that help give your body the nutrients it needs to work efficiently, but also seem to help prevent injuries to arteries which can help prevent early mental decline.

Flex Your Cognitive Muscles

A surprising impact exercise can have on your brain is in the region that controls memory and learning. Aerobic activity is the type of workout that raises your heart rate to the point of sweating. This type of exercise appears to increase the size of your hippocampus, which is the part of your brain that controls memory and learning. This is because aerobic exercise increases the release of growth hormones that affect the production of healthy brain cells and the development of new blood vessels in the brain.

Get Better Sleep

Sleep is important and it seems as though everyone skips out on it. But for healthier hearts and minds, it is vital to your long-term health. Some doctors believe that sleep is the brain’s opportunity to practice some good cleansing and clears out the toxic beta-amyloid buildup that occurs with protein deposits and is associated with Alzheimer’s and memory loss.

Looking for some other new secrets to living a healthy lifestyle? With this FREE A-Z guide on Living and Aging the Way You Want you can learn the ABCs of aging successfully. Download your PDF and start living the lifestyle you want.

Twin Lakes is a continuing care retirement community in Cincinnati, Ohio, offering villa homes, apartments, rehab services, and more. For more information, contact Twin Lakes online or at 513-247-1300.

Teaching Old Dogs Better Tricks: Seniors and Technology

It is a commonly accepted fact that seniors don’t understand technology. However, contrary to popular opinion, many seniors over the age of 50 have embraced their tablets and smartphones just as much as the younger generation. So why, then, does this untrue and –frankly– agist mentality about seniors and technology persist?

There are many reasons older adults are embracing technology at record rates. Recent studies show that seniors are adapting to the digital space more than ever before. About 70% of seniors are connected to the internet and use their phones, tablets, or laptops to access it.

That is why it is so important to put an end to this stigma as it reinforces negative stereotypes about seniors. So, here are the facts about seniors and technology:

Seniors Are More Likely to Be Dependent on Technology

As many Boomers enter their senior years, there is a demographic shift regarding how the senior community understands and uses digital devices. This is particularly true when it comes to care. The number of seniors needing some form of assistance far exceeds the number of caregivers in the job market. In fact, by 2050, the ratio of caregivers to seniors in need of assistance in the 80+ age group is expected to drop to as low as three to one. This number reveals a surplus of seniors that will need to manage another option for aging well without a care provider. Many seniors are turning to digital options to mitigate their needs. Now, seniors are adopting wearable devices, “smart” home amenities, and digital medication dispensers.

Seniors Like Technological Advances

Of the 70% of Americans over fifty who use the internet, many tend to view technology in a positive light. In fact, 58% of adults over 65 say technology has a positive impact on society. And of them, 10% profess to be online constantly. This is creating a push for software developers to consider the user characteristics of older adults to promote better user experiences during the design process. This may include larger text and buttons for poor eyesight associated with aging. Color vision also commonly declines with age and some seniors may have trouble distinguishing certain colors and need higher levels of contrast.

The Seniors of the Future

Interestingly, Boomers make up a huge part of the population. According to the Census Bureau by 2030, all baby boomers will be over the age of 65. That’s over 21% of America’s population. The fact is, the aging population is simply too large to ignore or disregard as many previous generations.

Similarly, seniors of today recognize the major benefits of technological advances in maintaining health and independence. This creates more opportunities for businesses to create better aging options in the midst of a growing caregiver crisis.

Want to improve your own technological skills? Try converting your photos to digital copies.

If you want helpful tips to keep you energized as you age, check out our FREE e-book Living and Aging the Way You Want. Inside you will find helpful bits of advice on living your best life. Download your PDF by clicking the icon below.

Twin Towers is a continuing care retirement community in Cincinnati, Ohio, offering patio homes, apartments, rehab services, and more. For more information, contact Twin Towers online or at 513-853-2000.